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  1. #49
    Senior Member artmak's Avatar
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    Oh that wide frame looks stunning!

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  3. #50
    Member dawerner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by psyb0rg View Post
    I kinda wish I almost started with this in the beginning of the project to help set the mood and pace of the cinematic.
    I disagree. I think the order you did it in, creating the scene and cinematic then add a matching soundtrack, was the way to go. We did it the same way. Since the music is mostly meant to enhance our viewing of the building, putting it as a priority after the important parts of your entry is a good way to make sure that you're not restricting your cinematic. Our cinematic is precisely timed to our music and we have to do a lot of back and forth with tweaking our matinee or music as a result. I made a big artistic change to the first few seconds of our video sequence and that caused us to need to rerecord the entire thing!
    Last edited by dawerner; 09-13-2015 at 08:24 PM.

  4. #51
    Administrator bakbek's Avatar
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    Hi Hadar,

    When you finish... Please make it official by entering this here as well - http://ronenbkr.mn/thevineyardsubmit

    final deadline is set to September 15th, 23:59 SST Midway Atoll Time, UTC/GMT-11

    Good luck!

  5. #52
    Member psyb0rg's Avatar
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    Lovely music... very serene Also great job on the wine chimes
    lol & thanks, (i see what you did there...:P)

    Oh that wide frame looks stunning!
    appreciated @artmak. was hoping to see your vertical vineyards!

    final deadline is set to September 15th, 23:59 SST Midway Atoll Time, UTC/GMT-11
    cool, will do.

    on the development front, am packing a build in the background now for some testing. in the process of building the cinematic, thought i'd post a few screenshots. the video is being captured in matinee. no post-production outside of UE4. any screen space elements are handled with UMG, but there are only a couple minor things anyhow. the level blueprint has a matinee controller that handles the necessary events and post-process or director groups are being used for camera transitions.

    [edit] wanted to clarify the video capture process...shadow play was used to record the playback, and premier was used to crop the video (i was using cinema widescreen format so my desktop still showed up in the capture) and export in the media encoder to various formats. all visual fx, camera cuts, event triggers, and sound are in-game and controlled through matinee.

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    depending on how the next hour goes, will try and post the final tonight.
    Last edited by psyb0rg; 09-16-2015 at 05:06 PM. Reason: to clarify the video capture process

  6. #53
    Member psyb0rg's Avatar
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    Third Wind Vineyards

    https://youtu.be/aRfcxYbvnLE

    Third Wind Vineyards is a conceptual design study that focuses on engaging the land while reflecting the industrious nature of wine making. The building introduces elements associated with 'green design' including three dominant vertical axis wind turbines serving as a visual fulcrum. The turbines are anchored into a central programmatic space purposed for wine fermentation. The roof of this space is designed as the though the earth has been peeled up and interwoven with operable photo voltaic glass panels allowing natural light to reach the space below. Flanked on both sides, this central space is connected to a hotel and spa reaching ten stories into the sky as well as a wine cave descending several stories below grade. Situated on an ocean side plot of land reminiscent of California's central coast, the building maintains a low profile to allow wind to flow through and around toward the vineyards. The deceptively irregular hotel however, reaches upwards to give guests stunning views of the coast line. Guests can also wander freely throughout the facility, finding their way to a gathering point adorned with a fire pit, or venture even deeper into the wine caves to discover that perfect sip accompanied by a unique chandelier reminiscent of an exploding barrel frozen in time.

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    Thanks to all for feedback, support and a really enjoyable journey.

  7. #54
    Member psyb0rg's Avatar
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    Post Mortem:

    It's not a real project until you can write a post-mortem, so here goes...

    The Design:

    The design evolved throughout the three months of development from a simple retaining wall to a decentralized winery and hotel spa. There were several moments where design changed considerably. The first sketch assumed the vineyard would be tucked into a small mountain valley. This went well with the first landscape vignettes, and 20/20 hindsight, this would have been great for the final product. However, more brainstorming led to more ideas including some random concept development using mediums ranging from sketch work to UE4 explorations. Different parts of the vineyard compound were abstracted and evaluated independently. As I explored more of the landscape forms, I really liked how coastal erosion impacted the node-network I had created in world machine. Generally I'm drawn to coastal areas, so this was a great opportunity to study this geological feature in more detail. Wine cave storage became a cave inspired by past-meets-future underground spaces. Fermentation was inspired by chemistry and mass production, but the hotel and spa never really gained a solid footing in the process which i believe is evident in the deadline submission. Each of these components were developed from two perspectives: how does this evolve on its own, and how does it impact the other components. I think this approach is challenging when there is a strict deadline on the horizon. Had I committed to my first sketch at the onset and moved forward, I believe I could have had a higher quality product by the deadline. However, I thoroughly enjoyed the process of discovery while designing each element independently, bringing it into the UE4 world, and studying the impact it had on lighting, sight lines, mass composition, landscape architecture, etc.

    The Visualization:

    Visualization and/or design communication was a huge challenge for me. I did have prior experience porting models from various programs into UDK/UE4 so the production pipeline was pretty comfortable for me, however there were several elements I had to learn quickly like most of us, and several challenges I hit in key areas.

    >The Landscape:
    I was somewhat new to world machine. I've used it in the past here and there, but never really locked down the right way to bring it into UE4 and it took a lot of time to nail this down. After the first month or so, I was finally able to find a solution I could work with, but it was by no means optimized. My landscape materials also took awhile to figure out. my first attempt at using splatmaps to drive everything didn't give me the control over the landscape I wanted to have with painting, so I built several layers instead that each had their own logic. This meant I would have to manually detail most of my site, but that was one of the most fulfilling experiences I had during the project. I could sit hours on end with a wacom tablet and landscape materials painting without a care in the world. Realistically I only had a few hours a night intermittently, (or some weekends), but that was one of my favorite experiences in the process. Most of the foliage I pulled from some marketplace content i had purchased awhile ago, and this really helped me achieve the look I was going for.

    >The Vines:
    Finding a strategy early on for the vines actually worked out pretty well. At first it was pretty rough figuring out a way to build a spline that included soil, wood posts, and vines, each with their own alignment logic, but the solution I built worked out great...at least in the beginning. This ended up turning into a catastrophe. As my design evolved for the winery, mass production became an important element, and to convey this, I really wanted to instantiate several thousand vines across a landscape, and all in one view. The splines I created could do this with hierarchical instances, however they still had way too much overhead, even with shadows turned off. The alternative solution was to use the landscape material method which was ten times faster. however, the grid spacing method required that I use a vine model which could be rotated 360 and still look like it was on the vine-support-line, so the work I had done on creating vines which grew in a linear fashion was thrown out. Second, the grid only really works in one direction when you're creating rows. Third, creating rows meant I had to paint each individual row across the landscape (or use a map that had the masking pattern, but I couldn't get this to align correctly either). So I reverted back to the spline method and built LOD's that worked out great from a distance in a single shot, but framerate still suffered terribly. I assumed I would be able to figure out how to get it more optimized before running out of time, but time would prove otherwise. By the time I was cutting the cinematic, i realized i would not be able to come up with a solution, and so reverted to the landscape material foliage method, and pulled an older vine model back into the scene to be able to maintain 30fps during the cinematic, but at the cost of an undesired visual result.

    >The Lighting:
    I chose to go with dynamic lighting from the onset. The GI produced from lightmass is great, but ultimately I believe the future of this industry is fully dynamic lighting including dynamic GI. Hardware is getting faster, software is getting faster and more accessible, and the days of waiting for a render or lighting bake are probably coming to an end in the next few years. With the optimization technology being developed for VR, it only means non-VR content will perform that much faster. So with dynamic lighting in mind, I learned as much as I could about distance fields, light propagation, and movable lighting. this also meant more overhead, but i was willing to deal with this during development. Given that I was going to use dynamic lighting, my environment needed to exhibit some sort of change in every possible location. Things needed to move. Light needed to shift. Dark should be become light, and vise versa. The drawback of this hit me pretty hard though. Light propagation is still experimental. I took a risk to migrate to 4.9, but didn't realize that my LPV settings didn't migrate and that LPV didn't work in 4.9, so I lost several nights of work migrating back to 4.8.

    The Cinematic:

    While I watch movies and study camera work, I still take a lot of it for granted, so it took some time to figure out how to communicate a narrative about a vineyard in 60secs. What were the elements I wanted to show? What did I have time left to detail? What was the story I wanted to tell, and why did my camera playback suddenly drop to 5 fps? (I learned during the cinematic process I still needed to optimize a lot of content. The wine cave had an enormouse amount of translucency, was completely artificially and dynamically lit, and instantiated several hundred barrels. This was tough to figure out...but i digress). The story essentially became that of dynamic light and wind. The opening shot was an overview of the vineyard (and was when I figured out my vine strategy wasn't working) and attempts to convey the expanse of the land. The next couple shots focus more on the architecture including an interior shot of a casual dining/sitting area. This area was brought to life with wind chimes (wind quickly became a dominant theme in the project), and a folding door. The interior could still use some work, but this is really where light propagation shined. when the door opens, the camera catches how the indirect light starts to make the room glow a bit. The fermentation shots were primarily about mechanization. The last couple shots where really a transition from gathering (firepit) to solitude (cave), light (outdoor) to dark (indoor) and fire to water. Sound played a really important role in all of these sequences. Knowing when to dampen the wind sound and amplify the other ambient sounds really helped achieve a sense of drama. The final transition out of the wine cave and into a sunset is still questionable in my mind, but the movement of the camera and sun coupled with the animated exposure value help bring the two shots together.

    Life hit me (and probably all of us...home life, hardware failures, etc) pretty hard toward the end of the project, and in many ways this project was a battle of attrition I need to learn how to deal with. How we deal with those challenges is also what makes life exciting. Objectively speaking, I think my screenshots really fell short of what I could have achieved (I think my process was much stronger than the few 4am shots I gathered), but i'm pleased with my cinematic.

    All in all, this was an incredibly challenging project that taught me a lot. Most of my time with UE4 is in blueprints, so it was nice to be able to focus more on art direction this go round. I'll still be working on this project from time to time learning how to improve various aspects of it given what i've learned from the community's great entries. I look forward to seeing how this field evolves, and the imagination that can be brought to life with it.


    2015/09/25

    Abstracting a few moments out of the design process and studying the composition in the context of 'point, line, plane'

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    Last edited by psyb0rg; 09-26-2015 at 03:27 AM.

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