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Uniform interior Lighting whitout overexposed Areas?
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Thread: Uniform interior Lighting whitout overexposed Areas?

  1. #1
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    Default Uniform interior Lighting whitout overexposed Areas?

    Hi,

    I'm having some troubles with a special look and maybe you can help me

    My aim is to create some kind of uniform white ligting while preventing certain areas from being overexposed and on the other hand keeping enough contrast. These references come close to what I mean:

    Name:  st7.jpg
Views: 2760
Size:  59.3 KB

    For testing purposes I recreated the room roughly and tried some different light settings. My current scene has the following settings:

    - Linear Workflow (Colormapping: Linear, Gamma 2.2, Dark/Bright Multiplier 1)
    - Natural Lighting: Physical Sky with Default Settings (Sun invisible)
    - Artificial Lighting: A 850 Lumen Light at the ceiling
    - Physical Camera Settings: ISO: 100, Shutter-Speed: 100, F-Stop: 4

    But as you can see, my scene is much too dark altough I used 100 Bounces in the Lightcache. So do you have any hints how the get this uniform kind of lighting with the linear workflow?

    Name:  iso_100.jpg
Views: 9360
Size:  24.5 KB

    Thanks and best regards!

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  3. #2
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    Your room looks to be a 50% grey?

    If you match it up to more white like your reference images you might see a significant increase in the amount of indirect light in your scene. To avoid blowouts you could try to use Exponential mapping as your tonemapper.

  4. #3
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    Thanks for your reply!

    The Material that I used for the rendering was a 90% white, even if it looks like a much darker color tone.
    I tried the exponential tonemapping you mentioned and also Reinhard and it helped a lot! After playing around I ended up with Reinhard tonemapping with a Burn-value around 0 and I think it works really well for this purpose.

    From a technical point of view, I'd really like to know if it's physically correct to use other color mapping methods besides linear in conjunction with the Linear Workflow. Nowadays you can read about the LWF everywehere but I it seems that you can't achieve certain light situations without the help of little tricks like exponential color-mapping or reinhard.

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by okazaky View Post
    Thanks for your reply!

    The Material that I used for the rendering was a 90% white, even if it looks like a much darker color tone.
    I tried the exponential tonemapping you mentioned and also Reinhard and it helped a lot! After playing around I ended up with Reinhard tonemapping with a Burn-value around 0 and I think it works really well for this purpose.

    From a technical point of view, I'd really like to know if it's physically correct to use other color mapping methods besides linear in conjunction with the Linear Workflow. Nowadays you can read about the LWF everywehere but I it seems that you can't achieve certain light situations without the help of little tricks like exponential color-mapping or reinhard.
    It looks like you still have vignetting on. Next to that, go for a 222, 222, 222 white material. I normally don't go more white than that, lower your shutterspeed to about 25 with f4 and 100 iso. Then go reinhard way with a low burn value.

  6. #5
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    Did you use artficial lighting on windows opening...?

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